Review – Dianne Gee’s Demonstration

What a wonderful start to our program of demonstrations for 2016. Dianne began by taking us through ‘what happens before you put your brush to paper, what are the steps the artist took to get to the finished work’. *Dianne sits and studies the scene – makes a quick plein air watercolour painting to capture the light. *In the studio she looks at this painting and decides which parts she will paint – 3 options were chosen. *Using black paint she did a tonal sketch of this portion of the painting. *Decides what shape painting will be. *Colours – a) warm  yellows/ warm greens / red roof/ leave white on house b) cool blue sky and blue added to all tones / trees strong blue/ bright lively picture  / shadows ultramarine. ***************** For the next section of the demonstration Dianne told us about how she started thinking about WHIMSY in paintings. She then did a series of bird paintings which led to two successful exhibitions. Hunted for cockatoos with camera to show their shapes in flight and in trees. * Dianne does 2 coats of gesso on canvas and then paints the background colour first – she does 3 coats of this colour so you need to mix enough paint and keep it in sealed containers, * To see which colour background is suitable she paints her composition on 2 small canvases (approx. 20cm x20cm) – one with blue and the other pink. For the large canvas she chose the blue. *Using black outline the order of painting after the background colour dries is FLOWERS. LEAVES, BRANCHES and lastly the...

Our Wonderful Four Days with Julie Goldspink

    Our feast of painting with Julie began on Monday 19th October with a  one-day workshop at the Jamberoo Youth Hall. Here Julie guided us  through the painting of ‘ Honey-eaters in Grevilleas’. Julie had several  photos from which to compose her work. She discussed  how to place the  elements from each photo she wanted to include in her  painting and  then demonstrated each aspect of the painting, guiding us in  brush and  colour choice followed by the techniques needed to produce the  completed painting.                 Demonstration on Tuesday 20th October.    Review by Cheryl Howlett About 30 people enjoyed Julie’s demonstration of reflections in a river. She  had drawn rocks and trees on her 300gm block paper. Working from light to  dark (the watercolourist’s formula), she started by spraying the paper where  she wanted to paint the sky and background trees, , letting the paint move  down the paper. It was interesting how she left white where the main tree  trunks were and added various shades of green for the distant foliage. The  colour beaded as it moved down the paper when it hit dry paper areas. She then softened the reflections in the water which are always darker in tone. * Do not have the paper on too much of a slant as your paint will move too quickly. * Remember to add the sky to the reflections. * Always have a piece of paper the same as you are using to test the tone of colour. * Spray lightly where you want to work on the paper as this should prevent ‘cauliflowers’. Julie kept spraying where...

REVIEWS of Judith White’s Workshop – Contemporary Landscape

 Report by Helen Pain What a great two days of activity and inspiration 16 of our members enjoyed at Judith White’s recent workshop. Judith is a very generous and inspiring teacher.  She demonstrated and explained, encouraging everyone in our large group to experiment with techniques and colour palettes which were new, inspiring and exciting. Over the two days, using many cumulative processes, we each developed a unique and individual mixed media landscape from a photo of our own choice.  Some managed two! We explored positive and negative space, we used different papers to create different textures, we experimented with the way the pigment is absorbed by the paper to give different effects of transparency and opacity.  We checked dark against light, exit points and focal point, balance and harmony, line and tone, torn and cut edges. There was so much to learn, and so much to absorb and enjoy. While our landscapes were drying, Judith demonstrated and guided us as we explored the largely unpredictable outcomes  to be enjoyed using monoprint techniques.  Great fun. Our show and tell at the end of day two said it all! Thank you Judith White for a truly inspirational  experience.    Report by Lea Tucker Sixteen KAS members were challenged to step outside their usual art practice and comfort zone when, on the weekend of the 4th & 5th of July they participated in a Mixed Media Workshop with renowned Willoughby based artist Judith White. Using a personal photo for creative inspiration and compositional guidance, the group explored techniques such as toxic colour washed for backgrounds, the layering of specialty papers to give form,...

REVIEW of August Demonstration by Ros Psakis.

    FIGURES ON A BEACH IN OILS. Last Tuesday afternoon saw approximately 24 members and visitors enjoy a  wonderful demonstration by Ros Psakis.  We had technical issues with our camera, and then a blackout, so the afternoon didn’t follow our usual well-honed procedures, but nonetheless, a great afternoon of inspiration was had by all.  How lucky are we to have our Coach  House, where we could move onto the verandah and enjoy the afternoon sunshine while Ros created a charming scene of figures in a beach setting.  Thank you Ros, the Committee and everyone in attendance for being so accommodating and adapting to the changes.    Before the blackout  HINTS FROM ROS:  Use a limited palette:  Blue , Red and Yellow with warmer and cooler in each of these, plus Titanium White. Mix on a white surface. Brushes:  Long handled, chisel edge, long bristle.  Art Basics or Neef brand Medium:  Lean medium, reduced odour, attached to easel in a Birdseed holder.  Odorless solvent in a large jar for cleaning brushes Using photos:  Outdoor painting limits the subject to what doesn’t move, so use photos as well. Learn to interpret the photo so your work becomes a painting, not a painted photo. Check lighting state – front lit, back lit, side lit etc. Turn photo upside down to help see the tones – lightest lights etc. Keep the photo easily visible and refer constantly. Palette mixing:  Mix basic colour (eg  for 3 tones for skin -light red and yellow for basic skin tone, then adjust with a little white on one edge for lighter tone, a little blue on another...

REVIEW of DEMONSTRATION

Madeleine Szymanski demonstrated Collagraphs -2nd June,2015 “A collagraph is an artist’s hand-pulled print made from a plate or block which has been built up in slight relief with collage elements such as paper, fabric, thread, natural objects and impasto applications. Sometimes the block may have lines or areas carved into it as well. The whole plate must be sealed to make it impervious to inks and cleaning agents. The oil-based ink used for printing can be rubbed into the lines and depressions (intaglio) like an etching or it can be rolled on to the surfaces (relief inking) like a woodcut, or both processes can be used together. Many collagraph plates are quite fragile and can produce only small editions.   I love making collagraph prints because the many stages of the process allow a great richness of interpretation. I start with drawings, then the building of the plate – choosing the collage materials and adhering them. Then the inking and printing, where various techniques and colour combinations are tested. At each stage there is scope for my subconscious to influence decisions and hopefully lead to an image close to my original inspiration.”                                                               Madeleine Szymanski  Madeleine presented a wonderful demonstration of her artistic process in the creation of her beautiful collagraphs.     Using a variety of materials including silk organza thread, fabric, dried leaves, lace, rice paper and even coffee grounds,  she created a picture by collaging with binder medium onto matt board. This created a plate which,  when sealed front and back,  was ready for inking.     Coloured etching inks were then carefully applied to her plate...
Hiren Patel’s Workshop Images

Hiren Patel’s Workshop Images

At the end of day 1 of the workshop, the participants were busily putting the finishing touches to their work under the helpful guidance of Hiren. A great day was had by all and they are all looking forward to Sunday where they are aiming to paint two paintings!        Hiren with three stages of his demonstration. Thanks to Kathy Karas for the 3 photos above. She says;   ‘Looking forward to another lovely day at Hiren’s workshop. What a nice guy and so giving of his time and great instruction.’                 We look forward to seeing the results of their second day. Sunday’s Challenge!             How well they all did. Congratulations.  ...

REVIEW: Mirjana Psakis Demonstration

On Tuesday, 7th April, members and guests of Kiama Art Society were not only treated to an excellent demonstration of how to execute a portrait painting from sketch to completion, but also given an educative journey in painting techniques and art practice guidelines. Mirjana Psakis, a self-taught oil painter, was inspired to concentrate her art practice on portraiture, after a memorable visit to an Archibald Exhibition. To further complement her art practice and develop her style, Mirjana studied under South Australian artist John Lacey, whose artwork she admired, a well as attending a semester at The Julian Ashton School of Art. Mirjana’s monochromatic portrait demonstration commenced with the detailing of her tools of choice. Small, medium and large palette knives and watercolour brushes (to be used for oil & acrylic painting), a glass palette, (backed with black cloth to ensure the paint pigments can be viewed with realistic hues), odourless turps and an accompanying colour palette of: French Ultramarine, Cad Yellow, Cad Red, Pthalo Blue, Permanent Rose and White to be applied to smooth canvas paper. (Smooth being better for palette knife application) The initial portrait sketch of the “British as a Bowler” portrait was drawn in graphite pencil and then under-painted with acrylics. (Atelier Acrylic slowing Medium added to aid wet on wet & blending) Mirjana emphasized the helpfulness of eradicating the white background of portrait paintings early on in the process, this assisting the future tint and tone mixing/selections for the subject, without having the stark brightness of white dominating. She stated that the colour choice of the background is representational of the persona of the portrait sitter. As is...

Demonstration Reviews – February/March

These two demonstrations both were about black line drawing but so very different showing two techniques.      In February Dianne Gee  inspired us all with her knowledge, skill and passion for drawing and sketching, particularly with pen or brush and ink. Dianne encouraged us to keep a sketch diary, to sketch quickly and freely “for the moment”. She explained that this diary could be a travel journal, a reference of interesting people and places and things you have experienced, and a great way to remember the essence of the subject. Dianne demonstrated using a range of pens and brushes, mainly with Chinese ink, which can be diluted to give tone (as a wash) or used undiluted to give strong lines. We watched flowers, various birds, chooks, cows, horses and people evolve before our eyes with just a few simple shapes and some shading. Dianne’s energy and enthusiasm were contagious, so much so that we have asked her to lead us in a 1-day workshop session , where we can try the many techniques and hints that she illustrated so ably in the demonstration session.                                                     Helen Pain PLEASE CHECK THE DETAILS AT ‘ WORKSHOPS’  – ON OUR WEBSITE    The March demonstration by Christine Hill showed the very different techniques needed to accurately paint street scenes and buildings with perspective. Christine used a set square to ensure her lines were straight and details accurate. She took infinite care to get all her lines accurate before...
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